Homesteading Classes

Hey all,

I wanted to stop in to let you all know that we have been adding tons of homesteading courses as well as many more blog posts and bloggers at http://www.homesteadingedu.com.

Here’s a link if you’d like to see the courses that have been created. We have many more coming soon, and have a monthly fee soon:

https://www.homesteadingedu.com/courses/

Homestead in health, ya’ll!

Emily

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When you’re cold, they are cold…or maybe not

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When you’re cold, they are cold…or maybe not

It’s that time of year again when you’ll be seeing lots of posts on social media about bringing your pets inside. There is some truth to that, depending on the breed of dog you are referring to. Unfortunately, these posts, while meaning well fail to take into account that there are breeds that are purpose bred dogs which were not bred to be indoor house pets.

For example, the husky, or the livestock guardian breeds such as the Great Pyrenees, or the Anatolian. These breed were bred to be working dogs kept outside year round. They glory in colder weather. The livestock guardian breeds come from regions where it can get very cold, and the dogs don’t seem to mind. We do agree that they should have some form of shelter available where they can go get warm.

Don’t be too surprised though if your livestock guardian dog is seen outside in really cold weather. Our Pyrenees that we had, and the Anatolians always turned bouncy and playful whenever the weather got really cold, and we would see them laying out in snow or on ice. They were jubilant that the weather had turned cold.

Right  now, it is 13 degrees in our part of Oklahoma, and our livestock guardian dogs have been playing and then by mid day thanks to guarding all night, they have currently chosen to crash for a nap on the frozen ground. They have access to a warm shed and the barn. But, they like it out there!

 

Christmas Savings

Christmas Savings

Hey all,

With Christmas literally just days away, I got to thinking about how we go about saving money for Christmas and other times of the year. Here’s one thing we do.

As homesteaders, my family is always looking for ways to be frugal. One of the things we have started doing a few years back, is making the liquid laundry soap that the Duggar family makes. We’v.e found that it enables us to make large batches of soap fairly cheaply and we get more soap this way.

Here’s the recipe:

Ingredients

• 4 cups hot tap water

• 1 Fels-Naptha soap bar

• 1 cup Arm & Hammer super washing soda (not baking soda or detergent!)

• 1/2 cup borax

Preparation Instructions

1 Grate the bar of Fels-Naptha soap; place in saucepan with water over medium-high heat. Stir soap constantly until dissolved.

2 Fill half of a 5 gallon bucket (2.5 gallons) with hot tap water.

3 Add melted soap from saucepan, washing soda and borax to bucket. Stir until completely dissolved.

4 Fill remainder of bucket with hot tap water; let sit overnight.

5 (Optional: add 10-15 drops of essential oil to two gallons of concentrated soap after it has cooled.)

6 When ready to use, fill half of a clean laundry soap dispenser with the soap concentration and the other half with water. The two will form a gel.

We use 3/4ths of a cup of this to wash our clothes. It saves a lot on money. This is especially helpful in terms of all the extra things you can buy when you aren’t paying as much for laundry soap. Christmas just got easier.

Until next time,

Homestead in health ya’ll,

Emily

A New Discovery

A New Discovery

Hey all,

I try to keep a lifestyle of learning, and recently I learned something through an online class which I then tried with the Homesteadingedu web page. The class had me use the Safari app to add their website to my phone as an icon kinda like having an app. It keeps their class at my fingertips which is a good thing considering how much I’m usually up to.

It also works with our website, Homesteadingedu. The way you do this is:

1. Open the Safari app. Get it if you don’t have it.

2. Type in http://www.homesteadingedu.com

3. There is a little box with an arrow sticking out of it at the bottom of your Safari app. If you click on that, it will give you a bunch of choices.

Pick add to home screen.

You’ll get this screen on your phone:

Click add.

After you add, you’ll see an icon like this on your phone.

Now that you have that icon, you can convienantly visit the blogs of all the other homesteaders of different ages and experiences, plus you can take classes from your phone if you want. I thought it was pretty cool and wanted to share. Some of our other bloggers tell some fascinating old time stories in their blogs on that site.

If you don’t have an IPhone, I would recommend using google chrome on your android.

After you type in the website, click on the three dots in the upper right hand corner. It will open this.

As with Safari, select Add to Home Page.

There you are! A quick icon to check in on our site and see all the fun stories being told there. Like I said before, we also have a variety of cool classes available and more of those on the way.

Homestead in Health Ya’ll!

Emily

5 Reasons Why I’m Thankful I Can Homestead

5 Reasons Why I’m Thankful That I Can Homestead

Hi All,

I’m a little late on my Thanksgiving post because we had some delightful company over for Thanksgiving. But, I’m back for this week. I wanted to share with you some reasons why I’m so glad I get to homestead:

1. I eat better. One of the things that I’ve always loved about homesteading is that I know exactly what was fed to the animals that I eat. I know exactly what medications they’ve had and what illnesses if any that they had. I know what was used to fertilize the fields where my food is grown, and I know for fact that it was earth friendly. Nothing like goat and horse manure for the garden after it has properly decomposed. As a matter of fact, goat manure can even be used fresh because it’s a gentle manure on crops.

2. Exercise is much more enjoyable. When you are hauling manure, and you are helping animals that you care about and are raising for food, exercise becomes much more pleasant. Now, there is a mindest that you have to have about them though when you raise them for food. Yes, you care about them. But, you have to be careful not to let them become pets. They are livestock, not pets. That said, there is a lot of relaxation and pleasure in caring for them. It is also very peaceful working out in the garden or gathering wood.

3. It is a peaceful lifestyle. As a homesteader, I’m regularly doing things that while they count as work, I find that work peaceful and relaxing. There’s a sense of peace and calm out in the barn, whether you are watching a doe who looks like she might kid, or you are just taking care of the animals.

4. I’m never bored. There is always something that I can be doing. Working around family and the animals can be fun. For example, this winter, my mom and I will be building new shelters for some of the animals. It’ll be a team project. Then too, the more you hang out with your animals,the better you know them and the earlier you’ll recognize if one of them is starting to get sick. The sooner you know, the faster you can get them better.

5. It’s a healthy lifestyle. I have a balanced combination of food, work, rest, and friendships. The work is generally enjoyable, and we eat better because we raise most of our own food. We are forever learning new things, and so even our brains get exercised. We have made many friends along the way who are also homesteaders.

I could go on more on things that I love about homesteading, but I think I’ll save that for a future post.What are you thankful for this year?

Until next time,

Homestead in health ya’ll!

Emily

The Best Bread

The Best Bread

When I was growing up in Mexico, my family had primarily white bread that was interspersed with corn bread. So, while I wasn’t picky about other foods, I wasn’t too keen on bread that goes crunch. However, Dad loved it.

He began working on creating a bread that was similar to French bread, but wasn’t a white bread. It was closer to the darker gourmet breads.

The longer I’ve been homesteading, the more I’ve grown to really love that bread. This bread doesn’t look like much on the outside, but it’s just bursting with flavor and it’s made from scratch so we know exactly what went into the bread. This is particularly important if you have allergies or have a family member with allergies. Many times, in factories, they produce many products in the same area. This means that while an ingredient may not be on the label of your food, it could still be in your food. For my mother and I, this can be a problem. Thankfully, with this bread, since it’s made from scratch, we haven’t been having any further problems.

This is a bread that is a must have if you are having soup or stew. We have a course on making sourdough bread on our website www.homesteadingedu.com

This bread is so good, that it’s hard to not eat a whole loaf in just a couple of days. Go check out the course and give that bread a try. You’ll probably like it. It’s not Wonder bread. This stuff has more flavor than that!

Homestead in health, ya’ll!

Emily